According to German law, a "mini-job" is any job in which the monthly gross income does not exceed €450. If you work a mini-job, then your employer is not required to pay toward your insurance contributions. 

Non-EU mini-jobber

If you are working a mini-job and you're not from the EU, then you have three options for getting health insurance:

  1. Comprehensive private insurance (€140+/mo). This is the most expensive option, but it will guarantee you full health coverage. Keep in mind that if you choose this option it can be difficult to switch into the public system later on. To book a private health consultation, click here.
  2. Expat health insurance (€72/mo). If you're young and healthy, this is our recommendation. You can think of this type of insurance as "accident-only" insurance. It will protect you against something catastrophic, but it won't cover regular check-ups. Once you find a full-time job, you'll be able to easily switch to public coverage. To get expat insurance click here.
  3. Coverage as a dependent under someone else's public health insurance policy. If you have a spouse or parent with TK coverage then it may possible to get coverage through them. To check if this is possible, fill out this form.

EU mini-jobber

If you're from the EU and working a mini-job, then here are your options: 

  1. Join public insurance as a freiwilliges Mitglied (€140+/mo). Since most employers aren't required to pay for your healthcare contributions, you'll have to pay for them yourself. You will need to sign up for TK and submit an E104 form. To get covered, follow the steps mentioned here.
  2. Coverage as a dependent under someone else's public health insurance policy. If you have a spouse or parent with TK coverage, then it's possible to get covered by them. To get covered by them, fill out this form.
  3. Comprehensive private insurance (€140+/mo). This is the most expensive option, but it's full health coverage. Keep in mind that if you choose this option it can be difficult to switch into the public system later on. To book a private health consultation, click here.
  4. Expat health insurance (72€/mo). You can think of this type of insurance as "accident-only" insurance. It will protect you against something catastrophic, but it won't cover regular check-ups. Once you find a full-time job, you'll be able to easily switch to public coverage. To get expat insurance click here.
  5. Use your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to get health coverage. If you're working a seasonal mini-job, are staying in Germany as a student, or are only in Germany for a short time, you can use your EHIC. 

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